Off the Grid

2 years
ago

Betwixt and Between: Middle-Class Women Living with HIV/AIDS

Since middle-class women with HIV/AIDS likely possess more financial resources to address their diagnosis, we assume that they experience few negative economic and social outcomes of the disease. But Celeste Watkins-Hayes writes that they, too, experience isolation and economic vulnerability…

2 years
ago

Brian Babylon and Comedy as a Social Science

Comedians, like social scientists, are students of human behavior, says Celeste Watkins-Hayes in her conversation with the comic, radio host, and regular on NPR’s “Wait, Wait…Don’t Tell Me!”

Comedy

2 years
ago

HIV/AIDS and the 99 Percent

Celeste Watkins-Hayes explains how the HIV/AIDS epidemic and the Occupy movement gripping the nation—and world—are two sides of the same coin.

3 years
ago

Tony Fitzpatrick, Artist

Dmitry Samarov on the gregarious artist he picked up in his cab four years ago: “Life around Tony was rarely dull…. I’ve never known anyone better suited to being the center of attention.”

3 years
ago

Bill Savage, Writer and Editor

Dmitry Samarov met his future editor when the Northwestern prof bought one of the artist’s paintings in 2001. Here, more on Savage, an avid cyclist and scholar of Chicago history

3 years
ago

Noah Vaughn, Photographer

Dmitry Samarov introduces us to photographer Noah Vaughn, whom the writer met 20 years ago at the School of the Art Institute. Vaughn, writes Samarov, “documents the crumbling, abandoned parts of the city without making a fetish of them. And that is no small feat.”

3 years
ago

The Danger of a Single Story

Alex Kotlowitz explains the danger of crafting a single narrative—and discusses the great Chicago (and American) paradox.

3 years
ago

The Trauma of Violence and Our Broken Communities

Alex Kotlowitz, our inaugural writer-in-residence, tells the story of Eddie Bocanegra, one of the characters in the new documentary The Interrupters, and discusses the effects of violence on individuals and communities.